"If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Follow your bliss and don’t be afraid, and doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be."

Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth (via bookmania)

modcloth:

Ready for summer fun! 

expressions-of-nature:

The Amazon Forest by Dams999
laughingsquid:

World’s Best Cat Trophy By Archie McPhee
nemfrog:

The Moth Book. 1903.

nemfrog:

The Moth Book. 1903.

(Source: archive.org, via scientificillustration)

thebiologistapprentice:

Common reed frog(Hyperolius viridiflavus)
- Africa
Individual frogs have been observed to change their sex organs from female to male. This likely occurs when the population does not have enough males to allow procreation and is accomplished when a chemical trigger activates the sex gene to disintegrate the female organs and develop the male ones.

thebiologistapprentice:

Common reed frog(Hyperolius viridiflavus)

- Africa

Individual frogs have been observed to change their sex organs from female to male. This likely occurs when the population does not have enough males to allow procreation and is accomplished when a chemical trigger activates the sex gene to disintegrate the female organs and develop the male ones.

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

Scaphiophryne matsoko • An Enigmatic New Scaphiophryne toadlet (Anura: Microhylidae) from the Rainforests of north-eastern Madagascar  [2014]
A new species of Scaphiophryne is described from north-eastern Madagascar. The new toadlet species is probably at least partly fossorial as can be judged from its large and sharp metatarsal tubercle, and seems to lead a secretive or strictly seasonal life since very few adult specimens were collected despite intensive field surveys in the region. The new species differs from all other Scaphiophryne, among other characters, by the absence of a tarsal tubercle and reminds the genus Paradoxophyla in its strongly marbled ventral pattern on belly and hindlimbs, and by its triangular head shape with pointed snout…
(read more: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

rhamphotheca:

Scaphiophryne matsokoAn Enigmatic New Scaphiophryne toadlet (Anura: Microhylidae) from the Rainforests of north-eastern Madagascar  [2014]

A new species of Scaphiophryne is described from north-eastern Madagascar. The new toadlet species is probably at least partly fossorial as can be judged from its large and sharp metatarsal tubercle, and seems to lead a secretive or strictly seasonal life since very few adult specimens were collected despite intensive field surveys in the region. The new species differs from all other Scaphiophryne, among other characters, by the absence of a tarsal tubercle and reminds the genus Paradoxophyla in its strongly marbled ventral pattern on belly and hindlimbs, and by its triangular head shape with pointed snout…

(read more: NovaTaxa - Species New to Science)

rhamphotheca:

Shoebill, Virunga National Park, DR of Congo
Named for its strangely shaped bill, the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) is common in a strip of central Africa that runs through Virunga National Park. They mostly eat fish, remaining statue-like till they strike, but they also prey on snakes up to 60 centimetres long, and even baby crocodiles. Shoebills are big birds, standing up to 1.4 metres high and with wingspans of 2.6 metres. They are one of 706 bird species found in Virunga. Image: Nigal Parvitt/AWL/Getty
(via: New Scientist)

rhamphotheca:

Shoebill, Virunga National Park, DR of Congo

Named for its strangely shaped bill, the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) is common in a strip of central Africa that runs through Virunga National Park. They mostly eat fish, remaining statue-like till they strike, but they also prey on snakes up to 60 centimetres long, and even baby crocodiles. Shoebills are big birds, standing up to 1.4 metres high and with wingspans of 2.6 metres. They are one of 706 bird species found in Virunga.

Image: Nigal Parvitt/AWL/Getty

(via: New Scientist)

rhamphotheca:

The Cape Melville leaf-tailed gecko (Saltuarius eximius), is a spectacular new species (discovered 2014) from remote northern Australia. 

Image Credit: Conrad Hoskin 

(read more: Australian Geographic)